Mental Health Guide for Boys and Men With T1d – Diabetes Daily

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This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Liz Cambron-Kopco

Living with diabetes can lead to diabetes burnout and negatively impact mental health. Both diabetes and mental health conditions can be invisible diseases, making it isolating when you don’t “appear” sick.

This can be even harder for boys and men, who are less likely to engage with peer support or seek help for their mental health. If it feels overwhelming trying to figure out how to get started or where to ask for help, use this list of compiled resources to guide you.

If you or a loved one is in immediate danger, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255. You are not alone and are worth the call.

Getting Started

The first step in taking care of your mental health is finding a provider for help.

How to find a mental health provider

Most mental health providers are considered specialists, so you may be able to use your insurance’s patient portal to search for a specialist that is covered. If you are unsure how to use this directory, refer to your employer’s department of human resources or call your insurance’s customer service. Here are some other directories you can use to find a mental healthcare provider:

Online Therapy

Sometimes, seeing a mental health provider in-person is not an option, whether because of your location, insurance or personal preference. There are many online therapy options that either accept insurance or offer other payment options.

Free Online Mental Health Support

Mental healthcare services can be expensive, regardless of insurance, demographics or other socioeconomic factors. If you don’t have health insurance or can’t afford to see a specialist online or in-person, there are several free options that provide affordable access to mental health services.

Diabetes + Mental Health

Living with diabetes comes with its challenges, which may lead to diabetes burnout and taking a toll on your mental health. It may feel isolating to deal with your mental health on top of your diabetes, but know you’re not alone. Here are some resources for taking care of your diabetes and mental health.

Culture + Mental Health

When looking for a mental healthcare provider, it can be important to see a provider that understands your cultural background. Because culture also includes your identity, it’s important to have support that is inclusive, compassionate and welcoming. Here are some important resources that will help you ensure your culture is a priority in your mental healthcare services:

Military Mental Health

There are several mental health resources available to help people in the military, veterans and their families. People who have served or are serving need unique support and care. Here are some resources that can help:

Self-Management

Seeing a mental health provider is part of the journey, but the rest of the care happens at home. Use these resources to learn how to take care of your mental health at home:

Find Support in Community

No one understands your struggles more than other people in similar situations. Finding support in community can be a game-changer for your diabetes and mental health. There are several virtual communities, as well as local ones, that you can join. Here are some that may be useful if you are a person with diabetes:

Help in a Crisis

There may be times where you need immediate help and waiting for appointments or support groups may not be possible. You are not alone. Here are some crisis and emergency resources for you:



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Author: Mabel Freeman